Film Schedule for Saturday, March 11

All films screen at Cowell TheaterFort Mason. Tickets are now on sale on Eventbrite!

Full Film schedule   |  Thursday  |  Friday  |  Saturday  |  Sunday

Program 6 at 10:00 am

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THREE MILES FROM SAFETY: THE STORY OF THE USS CONESTOGA (USA), 19 min
David Ruck*
WEST COAST PREMIERE

In 1921, the USS Conestoga, a navy tug, set sail from San Francisco for American Samoa with 56 men on board. She was never heard from again. In 2009, a sonar survey of the Gulf of the Farallones revealed a 170-foot wreck. A remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was lowered. Out of the darkness a distinct shape emerged. It seemed very similar to the USS Hercules at Hyde Street Pier. —KH

5 GYRES ARCTIC EXPEDITION (Italy), 4 min
Franco Borgogno
A citizen science expedition collects data about micro plastic pollution throughout the Arctic. Set to an uplifting score, this film communicates the beauty of the ocean and what a collective team of researchers can achieve. —AB

 

MY HAGGAN DREAM (USA), 8 min
Robert Sams, Laura Sams & Stephani Gordon
Winner: IOFF 2017 Short Award
WEST COAST PREMIERE

On the island of Saipan, a young girl's mysterious dream about a haggan, or green sea turtle, leads her to investigate and help protect the sea turtles that live around her home. —IO

@415PLUMBER'S #OB_PLASTIC OBSESSION (USA), 7 min
Jeff den Broeder*

Grabbing a few rays at the beach could get you stuck by a used needle, though it rarely leads to a lifelong environmental preoccupation. But that’s what happened to Aaron, a plumber who now spends a couple of hours a day scouring San Francisco’s Ocean Beach for plastic—dolls’ arms, key rings, animals and soldiers. He works alone, enjoying the meditative silence. —SJPH

 

PLASTIC IS FOREVER (USA), 19 min
Dylan D'Haeze
Winner: IOFF 2017 Environment Award
WORLD PREMIERE

What happens when you throw plastic trash away? Dylan, a 13-year-old from the San Juan Islands, follows plastic trash to where it ends up and shows how kids can help make a difference in a world that is increasingly dependent on plastic. —RR

FROM THE GOLDEN GATE TO THE FARALLONES (USA), 37 min
Jack Bushell

Aussie transplant Simon Dominguez attempts the first solo 30-mile swim from San Francisco to the Devil's Teeth: islands of the great white shark. First-time Bay Area filmmaker Jack Bushell unwinds a tale of danger, jellyfish, blood in the water and, along the way, an encounter with "The Landlord." —DM

PANEL DISCUSSION 1 || WOMEN IN THE OCEAN
Saturday, March 11
12:00 noon to 1:00 pm
Fort Mason Center - The Firehouse

Moderator: Ellie Cohen, Point Blue Conservation Science
Panelists: Liz Taylor, DOER (Deep Ocean Exploration and Research)

Carlie Wiener, Schmidt Ocean Institute
Nicole Crane, Cabrillo College


Program 7 at 1pm
Shark Program

THE EDGE (USA), 5 min
Carlos Toro

One man's passion for the beauty, power, and ecological importance of the shark takes his photographic art into the night sea, where sharks appear in a dramatically different way. This beautiful film testifies to the critical edge on which the shark is surviving, in spite of abuse at the hand of man. —JCO

BENEATH THE SURFACE (Canada), 19 min
Fred Kroetsch
WEST COAST PREMIERE

Daniel Ernett becomes the first quadruple amputee to be certified in open water scuba diving. But he does not stop there — he decides to dive with sharks. Daniel’s positive take on life and his determination to keep pushing his limits inspire the people around him. —YI

BORNEO SHARK SPECIAL (USA), 12 min
Will Foster-Grundy
U.S. PREMIERE

As the most iconic animal in our oceans, sharks draw divers to Borneo from all over the world. Though there are still areas with healthy populations off Borneo’s Sipadan Island, sharks worldwide are under threat from shark fin soup industry. Marine conservationist David McGuire of Shark Stewards and his host, Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski, get up close to these majestic animals and look at what’s being done to save them. —GC

FINISTERRA (Mexico) 6 min
Erick Higuera
WEST COAST PREMIERE

Breathtaking coastal landscapes of Mexico’s Revillagigedos Islands, located where the Sea of Cortez converges with the open ocean, are captured by spectacular cinematography. The images are combined with dramatic music in an exploration of the diversity, abundance, and interdependency of marine life — a gray whale and her calf, tornados of schooling fish, colossal manta rays, pods of dolphin, and sharks. Let’s not take this place for granted! —GC

LITTLE TEETH – SAVING SHARKS ON BALI (Germany), 7 min
Henrik Schmitt

A surfer on the Indonesian island of Bali is horrified watching sharks being killed for their fins. He sets up floating pens and convinces local fishermen, who catch juvenile sharks in their nets, to sell them to him while they are still alive. Once the stressed sharks have recovered, they are released into a nearby marine park. Tourists can book ecotours, feed the sharks, and even swim with them. —KH

BLUE SERENGETI (USA), 42 min
Robert Nixon
Winner: IOFF 2017 Ocean Science Award

Vaster than the Serengeti National Park of Africa, the Pacific Ocean is brimming with its own predators who cross the ocean to feed on the abundant prey in the waters of the California National Marine Sanctuaries. Renowned Stanford University marine biologist Dr. Barbara Block uses cutting-edge camera tags to track the movements of marine creatures, giving us a rare perspective of the great white shark. —AB

PANEL DISCUSSION 2 || SHARKS
Saturday, March 11
3:30 pm to 4:30 pm
Fort Mason Center - The Firehouse

Moderator: David McGuire, Shark Stewards
Panelists: James Moskito, Great White Adventures
Mary Jane Schramm, Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, White Shark Stewards Project
Claudia Schmidt, Director of
The Jetlagged


Program 8 at 4:00 pm

WINDOW ON THE UNDERSEA WORLD (USA), 5 min
Jeff Leicher
WORLD PREMIERE

Unplug from your tecchnology and take a relaxing journey among the vibrant, coral-rich ocean floors of Bonaire and Saba, Indonesia. Listen to a hypnotic electronic soundtrack and lose yourself among the sea turtles, octopus, and frog fish — without ever getting wet. —AB

FABER NAVALIS (Italy), 30 min
Maurizio Borriello
Winner: IOFF 2017 Maritime Award

It might seem like just a video about the restoration of a wooden ship, but the actual subject of this film is the ecstatic state of mind of the shipwright: an Italian researcher in maritime ethnography who decided to learn traditional boatbuilding. Faber Navalis is a beautifully crafted documentary by this renaissance-like director. —IO

BLUE VENTURES (USA), 6 min
Gabriel Diamond*

Fisheries conservation and marine protection are a challenge in poor coastal communities; people need to eat and the fish keep getting smaller and fewer. A new model demonstrates that applying traditional knowledge in Madagascar with seasonal closures and market management benefits the fish and the bottom line. —DM

HUNGER AT SEA (UK) 57 min
Hugh Pearson
WORLD PREMIERE

A gigantic whale travels 100 miles for a single day's four-ton meal. Lanternfish, pursued by dolphins, await a stunning surprise. Albatross exploit wave-churned seas, while sea lions and sharks buddy up to corral sardines. Be faster, bigger, more cunning or cryptic: however you achieve it, your hunger must be appeased. Shadowing biologist John Calambokidis, the filmmakers capture amazing blue whale footage imaginable. —MJS


Program 9 at 7:00 pm
Canada Program

RANGER (Canada), 8 min
Sandra Ignagni & Trevor Meier
CALIFORNIA PREMIERE

For over 30 years the MV Northern Ranger — or “Ranger,” as it is affectionately known by locals — has tirelessly navigated the narrow straits and unpredictable weather along the remote Labrador coastline. With no words necessary, this sensory documentary explores Ranger’s unique auditory and visual landscapes as passengers and crew are united on their 192-hour journey home. —IO

THE END GAME (Canada), 29 min
Duane Sharman*
WORLD PREMIERE

Coral reefs are central to the health of the oceans, but ocean warming and acidification threaten the survival of many of them. Dr. Ruth Gates searches for the answer to why some corals survive ocean warming while others do not. The notion of “assisted evolution” may be a solution in what may now be the the end game in saving the oceans’ coral reefs. —ST

SOLIDARITY AND THE ART OF SUSTAINABLE LOBSTER FISHING (Canada), 5 min
Steve de Neef
WORLD PREMIERE

Local fisherman in the small village of Punta Allen, Mexico, have created a unique sustainable lobster-fishing co-op. The development of special methods and self-regulation ensure they never over-harvest. Such solidarity benefits the community and makes generosity possible when unpredictable fresh-water intrusion affects parts of the fishery. —ST

BLUEFIN (Canada), 55 min
John Hopkins
Winner: IOFF 2017 Wildlife Award

Allowed by us to grow to maturity, bluefin tuna can reach the age of 30, weigh two tons, and swim like a torpedo. In a visit to Blue Lake, Prince Edward Island, Canada, we find that trying to protect these magnificent creatures is complex. Because we can’t observe their lives, we don’t think of tuna as wild animals, and therefore find it way to easy to kill — and eat — them. —SJPH

* Filmmaker is expected to be in attendance for Q&A.

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FULL FILM schedule  |  Thursday  |  Friday  |  SATURDAY  |  SUNDAY

Film synopses were written by the following Screening Committee members:

AB: Ana Blanco
GC: Gretchen Coffman
SJPH: Sidney JP Hollister
KH: Keith Howell
YI: Yuko Inatsuki
DM: David McGuire
IO: Ibon Olaskoaga
JCO: John Owen
RR: Rachel Rhodes
MJS: Mary Jane Schramm
ST: Stan Teng

The photo at the top of this page is a still from the film The End Game.