Film Schedule for Saturday, March 12

All films screen at Cowell TheaterFort Mason .

Full Film Listing  |  Thursday  |  Friday  |  Saturday  |  Sunday

Program 5 at 10am

* Post-screening Q&A with filmmakers

A sea otter does the backstroke - film still for The Fantastic Fur of Sea Otters

THE FANTASTIC FUR OF SEA OTTERS (USA), 3 min
Josh Cassidy*

How do sea otters stay warm in cold Pacific waters? Sea otter fur is surprisingly complex. This KQED science production takes an up-close look at sea otters’ fur—at up to 1 million hairs per square inch, it’s the densest fur of any mammal on Earth. —ST

The town on a small Caribbean island - film still for Santa Cruz del Islote

SANTA CRUZ DEL ISLOTE (USA), 19 min
Luke Lorentzen

On a tiny Caribbean island—the most densely populated on Earth—peace and tranquility reign. No crime exists, because "whatever happens to one family happens to everyone...this island is like one heart." But their once-thriving tuna industry is gone, and their subsistence way of life is in jeopardy. A fisherman and a young boy speak to this challenge as they move into an uncertain future. —MJS

Animated sea lion and fish underwater - film still for A Plastic Sea

DOMOIC ACID ATTACK (USA), 3 min
Steve Segal, Lesley Wisley-Padien & David Feiten*

You might have heard about the impact of domoic acid on the West Coast crab season this year. Learn more about the effect of domoic acid on the plankton, fish, and sea lions in the Bay Area. With help from the Marine Mammal Center, you can also learn what to do when you see a stranded or sick sea lion. —SM

A whale alert app shown on a smart phone - film still for Whale Aware

WHALE AWARE (USA), 8 min
Lauren Gilbertson*

The waters off the Golden Gate are teeming with great whales. Several institutions have united to keep the whales safer from ship strikes. Apps are available to anyone with a smartphone who from land or sea might sight a whale off the California coast. Download Whale Alert 2.0 or Spotter Pro for Apple or Android devices so you can immediately report a whale sighting. The location, movement, and aggregation of whales will be reported in near-real time to advise ships to take evasive action. —JCO

An orca jumps into the air as an audience watches at an outdoor marine show - film still for I Am Morgan: Stolen Freedom

I AM MORGAN: STOLEN FREEDOM (New Zealand), 5 min
Heiko Grimm, Carlos Godo Borras, & Irene Buesa Garcia

Close your eyes. Imagine the exuberance of freedom in the sea, the companionship of your true whale kin, the thrill of the hunt, the indefinable spirit of being “orca.” Now imagine living each day in the glass and concrete coffin in which you will die. For killer whales in captivity this is reality. (The only language you'll hear in this film is orca.) —MJS

An Iranian couple in the film still for Fish

FISH (Iran), 4 min
Saman Hosseinpuor

In some societies, clean water is not easy to come by. Sometimes one needs to improvise, often finding happiness in small ways in the process. —KH

Image of the Earth at night from space - film still for Sonic Sea

SONIC SEA (USA), 55 min
Michelle Dougherty & Daniel Hinerfeld*
Winner: 2016 Environment Award

Our oceans are awash in manmade noise, and it is killing marine life. Sonic Sea recounts the complicated mystery behind a mass whale stranding. In seeking an answer it explores an ocean’s delicate acoustic habitat where creatures feed, find mates, navigate, communicate, and cope with the sudden, dramatic changes our species has wrought. Featuring Ken Balcomb, Christopher Clark, Sylvia Earle and Sting, this film offers solutions, and underscores how the ocean's destiny is indeed our own. —MJS


Program 6 at 1pm
Shark Program

* Denotes filmmakers who will be at the screening for live Q&A

A southern stingray - film still for Changing Seas - Grand Cayman's famous stingrays

CHANGING SEAS – GRAND CAYMAN'S FAMOUS STINGRAYS (USA), 27 min
Alexa Elliott*

You've probably seen pictures of tourists posing with stingrays, but what if you knew that interacting with the stingrays might actually be harming them? How do you balance ecotourism with animal safety? Find out how Grand Cayman developed a plan to meet the needs of the stingrays, scientists, government and tour operators. —SM

Peruvian fisherman out on his boat - film still for Home at Dawn

FINconceivable (USA), 4 min
Lily Williams*
Winner: 2016 Animation Award

What happens if sharks disappear? This animated film explores the importance of sharks to the marine world, and the dire consequences if the appetite for shark fin soup should cause the extinction of the fiercest ocean predators. —KH

A cat shark swims along the sea bed - film still for Cute Sharks on the Hook in Borneo

CUTE SHARKS ON THE HOOK IN BORNEO (Malaysia), 8 min
Aaron Bertie Geronski

Like large iconic oceanic sharks, small cat sharks and dog sharks are on the menu. In an investigative series from Borneo, Shark Stewards from San Francisco Bay joins with Malaysian partners to track down these elusive elasmobranchs in reefs, fish markets and restaurants. —GC

Up-close of a stingray's face - film still for How Do Sharks and Stingrays Use Electricity to Find Hidden Prey?

HOW DO SHARKS AND RAYS USE ELECTRICITY TO FIND HIDDEN PREY? (USA) 4 min Josh Cassidy*
Sharks and rays have a “secret sense” that detects animals’ bioelectric fields, so concealment by prey is ineffective, resistance is futile (well … sometimes.) “You can run, but you can’t hide.” We’ve just begun to understand this unique mechanism. Could this help us coexist with sharks, keeping them out of our nets, and away from our surfers? —MJS

A dreamy underwater "shepherdess" - film still for Shark Shepherd

SHARK SHEPHERD (Canada), 2 min
Benjamin Von Wong*

If fashion models can help sell cars, maybe they can help save sharks. An underwater photographer places a terrestrial shepherdess under the sea watching over threatened sharks—KH

A flotilla of outriggers full of whale shark tourists - film still for On the Brink: Uncharted Waters

ON THE BRINK: UNCHARTED WATERS (USA), 54 min Vincent Soberano* – U.S. PREMIERE
Winner: 2016 Conservation Award

Whale sharks were fished and then overfished. Now thousands of tourists take special trips to swim with them. The whale sharks are protected, and all feels good. But could we be loving our whale sharks to death? —GC


Panel Discussion 1 at 3:30pm
Art & Action: Communicating Conservation Through Media

Free and open to the public. Fort Mason - Building B, 3rd floor, Room 300    
Note the change in venue to the Bayfront Theater (BATS Improv Theater).

PARTICIPANTS:

Ian Hinkle, Producer  |  Reaching Blue: Finding Hope Beneath the Surface
Media & Strategic Communications, Global Reef

Kip Evans
Kip Evans Photography  |  Mission Blue

Lily Williams, Animator & Author  |  FINconceivable
Lily Williams Art

Neela Eyunni, Producer  |  On the Brink: Uncharted Waters

Benjamin Von Wong, Photographer  |  Shark Shepherd

Moderated by David McGuire, Director of Shark Stewards

 


PROGRAM 7 - 4PM
SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD PROGRAM

* Post-screening Q&A with filmmakers

Tuna on board the Solomon Ruby in the Solomons - film still for Saving Our Tuna

SAVING OUR TUNA (Australia), 23 min
Patrick Fries* – U.S. PREMIERE

Mankind consumes 4.5 million tons of tuna annually. Half of this catch is taken from the waters around the island nations of the Western Pacific. In many places, this is the only industry that supports the local Pacific Islanders. These nations have joined together to use advanced satellite, sonar, and aerial technologies to work toward sustainability, prevent illegal fishing, and develop sound principles of ecosystem management. —JCO

Man smoking at the docks - film still for Thailand's Seafood Slavery

THAILAND'S SEAFOOD SLAVES (UK), 14 min
Environmental Justice Foundation

Filming undercover, the Environmental Justice Foundation exposes the abusive and corrupt employers and officials in Thailand operating with impunity in Malaysian and Indonesian waters. Workers trapped in an endless cycle of debt, exploitation, and brutal abuse risk death if they try to escape. The boats catch "trash fish"—small species and juvenile fish unfit for human consumption but vital to the food web—to create fishmeal to feed Thai shrimp for export.

Jean Wiener with two other Haitian men wearing t-shirts with Wiener's foundation logo - film still for Restoring Hope

RESTORING HOPE (USA), 4 min
John Antonelli*

Hurricane devastation and extreme poverty have forced Haitians to cut their mangrove forests to make charcoal and to overfish their island waters. After two decades of political work and citizen participation, Jean Wiener’s foundation persuaded the government to establish Haiti’s first Marine Protected Area to safeguard these mangroves and reefs, both nursery areas for juvenile fish. This act together with work by local people to replant mangroves are bringing back the depleted fisheries. —SJPH

A platter of fish - film still for Of the Sea

OF THE SEA (USA) 56 min
Mischa Hedges* – WORLD PREMIERE

Few California fishing families remain. In 1981, there were nearly 7,000 families; today there are only 1,800. To revive a fading way of life, Bay Area fishermen and entrepreneurs are exploring ways to support sustainably produced seafood. —DM


Panel Discussion 2 at 5:30pm
Sustainable Seafood: How to make the Right Choice

Free and open to the public. Fort Mason - Building C, Classroom 205    
(Room subject to change.)

PARTICIPANTS:

Jenn Kemmerly
Director of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program

Alan Lovewell
Founder, Real Good Fish

Jonn Mellor and Khevin Mellegers
Fishermen

Moderator: Maggie Ostdahl
Aquarium of the Bay, Sustainable Initiatives Manager
San Francisco Bay Area Sustainable Seafood Alliance


Program 8 at 7pm

* Post-screening Q&A with filmmakers

Zoe the fish is on a mission - film still for Zoe and Her Adventures

ZOE AND HER ADVENTURES IN THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Italy), 3 min
Patricia Marti Puig, Paula Andrea Zapata & Vasiliki Markantonatou

Zoe is a fish with a mission: she undertakes a perilous voyage through the Mediterranean, venturing far from the safety of her Eden-like “no-entry” (for humans, that is) Marine Protected Area, into gradually less-protected waters. They're fraught with dangers: nets, propellers, sinister intruders. Far away, in another MPA, her paramour awaits. Discover how her journey unfolds. —MJS

A polar bear pauses in the snow - film still for Speechless

SPEECHLESS – THE POLAR REALM (New Zealand), 44 min
Richard Sidey
Winner: 2016 Wildlife Award

From images of millions of seabirds swirling about nests on sheer island cliffs, to vistas of blue-white glacial landscapes, to close-ups of grunting walruses in beach wallows, this film explores both the lands and seas of the polar realm and its remarkable creatures. Miriama Young’s graceful music reinforces a pace that allows us the time to see what the images gloriously offer. At the film’s end a double exposure of a polar bear’s ghostly figure ambles through its threatened Arctic world. ––SJPH

A cuttlefish up close - film still for You Are Not Hallucinating, That's Just Squid Skin

YOU ARE NOT HALLUCINATING, THAT'S JUST SQUID SKIN (USA), 3 min
Josh Cassidy*

Do you know what a chromatophore is? This film explains why and how squid and octopus skin has the amazing ability to change its camouflage to match its surroundings as a means of protection. —ST

An Inuit man with his dogs and sled - film still for SILA and the Gatekeepers of the Arctic

SILA AND THE GATEKEEPERS OF THE ARCTIC (USA), 70 min
Corina Gamma*
Winner: 2016 Coastal Culture Award

To the Inuit of Qaanaaq, 1,200 miles above the Arctic Circle, “Sila” is the weather, the sky, “all that is out there.” From a remarkable opening sequence to interviews with Inuits, whose language sounds like it has been chipped from ice, director and cinematographer Corina Gamma uses superb images, restrained but forceful editing, and Jorge Corante’s music to show us a world where Sila is slipping out of balance, while a team of international scientists tries to find out why the Inuit struggle with the consequences. —SJPH

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FULL FILM LISTING  |  Thursday  |  Friday  |  SATURDAY  |  SUNDAY

Film synopses were written by the following Screening Committee members:

AB: Ana Blanco
GC: Gretchen Coffman
SJPH: Sidney JP Hollister
KH: Keith Howell
DM: David McGuire
SM: Shannon Murphy
JCO: John Owen
MJS: Mary Jane Schramm
ST: Stan Teng

The photo at the top of this page is a still from the film On the Brink: Uncharted Waters.